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Peer Review

Class Agenda

  1. Finalizing our Honor Pledge
  2. Blog Peer Review

Finalizing our Honor Pledge

Here is our final edited version:

On my honor as a writer and participant in online spaces, I pledge that I will maintain the autonomy of any source or website nor claim anyone else’s copyrighted work as my own regardless of medium or mode of communication (writing, sound, image, video, etc.) unless the work has been transformative in purpose of function by me; I will always attribute credit for the work of others that appears within my projects for this class. I also pledge that when including images and other media in the projects for this class I will first attempt to use freely licensed or public domain materials. When I use copyrighted material for the purposes of social, cultural, or political critique or artistic remix I will abide by what is an ethical and legal use of the fair use doctrine with legal leeway for educational purposes.

Blog Peer Review

  1. Be sure that you already completed your blog explanation sheet for your group (this should have been done early in the weekend, but now is the last chance to complete it).
  2. If you haven’t already, review your partner’s/group member’s blog and complete the peer-review worksheet.
  3. Log into Canvas and upload the peer-review sheet and read your review sheets from your partner/group members.
  4. Then as a group each author will take about 5-7 minutes to answer the questions posed by his/her reviews and ask for any clarification of or additions to the revision advice.

Homework:

Ridolfo & DeVoss’s Composing For Recomposition: Rhetorical Velocity and Delivery
Blog Post 3
Tech Presentation Group 4: Photoshop

Honor Pledge, Research and Art in the Digital Age, and Peer Review Prep

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Class Agenda

  1. Tech Presentation #3: YouTube
  2. Wrap-up plagiarism, copyright, Honor Pledge, and adding a Creative Commons license to your blog using widgets
  3. Sirc, Duchamp, readymades, and postmodern art/creativity sharing
  4. Discussion of Digital Breadcrumbs
  5. Research Journal Assignment
  6. Peer-Review Prep

Finalizing our Honor Pledge

Here is the version from a previous section of CO302 that we have been debating:

On my honor as a writer and participant in online spaces, I pledge that I will maintain the autonomy of any source or website not claim anyone else’s copyrighted work as my own regardless of medium or mode of communication (writing, sound, image, video, etc.) unless the work has been transformative in purpose of function by me; I will always provide attribute credit for the work of others that appears within my projects for this class. I also pledge that when including images and other media in the projects for this class I will first attempt to use freely licensed or public domain materials. When I use copyrighted material for the purposes of social, cultural, or political critique or artistic remix I will abide by what is an ethical and legal use of the fair use doctrine.

Are we satisfied with this? The first sentence addresses plagiarism. The second and third sentences address copyright and fair use. Last time we discussed this we seemed to be in agreement about the plagiarism section, but unsure about the copyright section.

Sirc, Duchamp, readymades, and postmodern art/creativity

Sirc’s argument might be summed up as art, including writing, should have no hierarchy of aesthetic value but instead art should be flattened and democratized—all materials and forms are appropriate and the choice of material and form should be made situationally (i.e., rhetorically) not according to arbitrary rules that have been established by a disciplinary elite.

With the above summary of Sirc in mind, let’s look at some of your readymades and assisted readymades. Why did you choose to work with these materials and how did you decide on the alterations you would make to them?

Digital Breadcrumbs: Doing research online

Freewrite: Open up the ‘Discussion‘ section of our class Canvas page and take 5 minutes to write and post your answer to the following question.

How do you use (or not) the CSU library for research? What could the library do to make it more useful for you and other undergraduate researchers? What other online research tools do you use? What non-digital research tool do you use?

The big takeaway from Purdy and Walker (I will elaborate):

If we accept Barbara Mirel’s (1996) definition of invention as the discovery, selection, and retrieval of appropriate information (pp. 102-103), then such activities can be inventional–making what are often taken to be unengaged, aimless behaviors productive parts of composing. Indeed, the participants in this study find such work an important part of topic generation and idea development for their academic writing tasks. (Playing Researcher)

Research Journal Assignment

Just as you are now getting in the habit of completing a blog post every Thursday, you should also now get in the habit of completing a Research Journal every other Tuesday. The Research Journal serves two purposes: 1) it is a chance for you to see what others (related to your blog topic) are doing and 2) thus gives you post ideas, modes to emulate, and modes to avoid. The Research Journal is a chance to get you involved in the conversations on your topic, but it also encourages you to make rhetorically sound choices when doing so.

Peer Review Preparation

We will do two rounds of peer review this semester, each worth 25 points. (50 points total or 5% of the final grade)

  1. Fill out the sheet in the “Blog Author Info.” section of ‘Discussions’ in Canvas for your peer review group members and me. Upload the file to your group file Discussion in Canvas as soon as possible. Completing this sheet and giving it to your group members is worth 5 points.
  2. Get in your groups and go over your author information sheets to make sure your group members understand the feedback you are looking for.
  3. As a class, we will go over the review sheets (found in the “Blog Review Sheets” Discussion section of Canvas you will fill out for homework and upload to your group file Discussion in Canvas to access during Tuesday’s peer response workshop. Completing the review sheets is worth 10 points. Participating in class on Tuesday is worth an additional 10 points. Be sure to put your review sheets in the “blog reviewer sheets” Discussion and to title them with the name of the person whose blog you reviewed.
  4. If you are missing a group member today, they must upload their author information sheet to Canvas by Tuesday.

Homework:

Read: Ridolfo & DeVoss, Composing For Recomposition: Rhetorical Velocity and Delivery
Complete the Peer Review Preparation (see above info.)
Research Journal entry 1 due in Canvas
Review the final version of the Honor Pledge to make any final revisions before we accept it for final use in the class:

On my honor as a writer and participant in online spaces, I pledge that I will maintain the autonomy of any source or website nor claim anyone else’s copyrighted work as my own regardless of medium or mode of communication (writing, sound, image, video, etc.) unless the work has been transformative in purpose of function by me; I will always attribute credit for the work of others that appears within my projects for this class. I also pledge that when including images and other media in the projects for this class I will first attempt to use freely licensed or public domain materials. When I use copyrighted material for the purposes of social, cultural, or political critique or artistic remix I will abide by what is an ethical and legal use of the fair use doctrine.

Plagiarism and Copyright (and some advice on the Blog Analysis)

Below is our agenda for today’s class followed by some final advice for completing the Blog Analysis project, which includes a sample analysis of The Pioneer Woman’s blog.

Class session agenda

Go to Canvas and complete the WTL #5 on Copyright, Plagiarism, and Remix

Review the Blog Analysis assignment

Read over the Blog Analysis and the example post to see if there are any questions.

Review the Research Journals assignment
Review the Research Journal criteria to prepare you for future material for your blog posts. These will be a bi-weekly assignment that are due on every other Tuesday starting on Sept. 27.

Discuss plagiarism and copyright and the difference between the two. 
Read the examples of five separate plagiarism cases outlined in the article, 5 famous plagiarism and fraud accusations in the book world. Do they all seem equal in their ethical violations? Should there be legal consequences in each case? Issues to consider during our discussion:

  • citation v. remix
  • writing/print v. other forms of media
  • what is creativity? what is originality?
  • what about an artist’s ability to make a living from her art?

Copyright & Plagiarism Discussion

Lessig’s argument against current U.S. Copyright law (that you will watch in its entirety before class Thursday—see homework below) hinges on his reading of the copyright clause in the Constitution:

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His goal is to balance the rights of an artist to make money from his/her creation with the need for science and the arts (i.e., our culture) to advance by building on (i.e., remixing) previous work.

This brings us back to our list of questions/issues from the WTL:

  • citation v. remix v. piracy
    • two changes in code: technology and law
  • writing/print v. other forms of media
  • what is creativity? what is originality?
  • what about an artist’s ability to make a living from her art?
  • What is fair use?

Danielle DeVoss and James Porter’s article (that you will read for Thursday) asks us to think about remix as a form of writing, one that is essential to communication and creativity in the digital age and one that changes how we should think about plagiarism and citation (and by extension, the economic models by which artist make a living from their art). One of their primary examples is a politically motivated remix of the 2004 Pepsi/iTunes Superbowl commercial that featured some of the teenagers who were prosecuted for illegally downloading music from the Internet. Let’s look at it in order to work through some of the questions/issues listed above.

Here is the original commercial:

Here is the remix:

Honor Pledge Drafting

After discussing the readings and our own positions on what should count as plagiarism and copyright violations in the digital age, we will craft our own version of the CSU honor pledge that fits the context of our course. The standard honor pledge reads as follows:

On my honor as a student, I pledge that I will not receive or give any unauthorized assistance on the assignments for this course.

Here is a version that students in a previous section of CO302 composed:

On my honor as a writer and participant in online spaces, I pledge that I will not claim anyone else’s work as my own regardless of medium or mode of communication (writing, sound, image, video, etc.); I will always provide attribution for the work of others that appears within my projects for this class. I also pledge that when including images and other media in the projects for this class I will, whenever possible, use freely licensed or public domain materials. When it is necessary for me to use copyrighted material for the purposes of social, cultural, or political critique or artistic remix I will abide by what I believe to be an ethical and legal interpretation of the fair use doctrine.

The CO302-specific honor pledge covers both plagiarism and copyright ethics and leaves room for the student to rhetorically justify uses of copyrighted materials that might be outside the letter of the law, but would be in keeping with Kleon, Lessig, or DeVoss & Porter’s philosophies.  Be prepared to draft a new version of the honor pledge in class on Thursday!

Questions on About pages, Welcome pages, header images, or the Blog Analysis project?

Here are some resources about creating static pages and menu items in wordpress:
Link to article about page basics
Link to a help article for menu items
Video instruction

Homework: